Academic Articles

Explore, upload, & discuss academic articles specific to exceptionality in Tech Ed classrooms

Note: Due to lack of academic articles specific to 'exceptionality in high school technology education classrooms', we have added the section 'exceptionality in high school classrooms' to draw ideas from for creating modified lessons, assessments, and projects for exceptionality.





Article #1

Preparing Technology Education Teachers to Work with Special Needs Students

Abstract:
The article focuses on guidelines for teachers that can help them in technology education programs and work with special needs students. Various educational reform movements and legislation such as the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, the Carl D. Perkins Act of 1990, the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) of 1990 and IDEA Amendments of 1997 focus on inclusion of students with special needs in regular classrooms to the maximum extent appropriate. Students must be provided equal access to technology education programs. This can help them gain basic knowledge about a variety of careers available upon completion of school. Teachers need to be aware of specific legislation, issues, and accommodations associated with students with special needs.

Evanciew, C. (2003). Preparing Technology Education Teachers to Work with Special Needs Students. Technology Teacher, 62(7), 7. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.


Article #2

A Blessing in Disguise.
Abstract:
The article focuses on various techniques of teaching the learning disabled students which was experimented in Tecumseh Middle School, Lafayette. In cases where there are not enough aides to help the special education students in classes, placing all the students requiring special assistance into one class has been suggested. It was found that special education students are counted in the Indiana Statewide Testing for Educational Progress. Since the tests are geared more toward mainstream students, the scores posted by the special education students had a negative effect on the school's overall scoring.

Yuill, R. (2004). A BLESSING IN DISGUISE. Technology Teacher, 63(5), 23-26. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.


Article #3

Assistive Technology in the classroom. (1996)
Abstract:
Focuses on assistive technology devices available for accessing computers. Benefits for handicapped persons; Examples of simple assistive technology devices.

Logwood, M., & Hadley, F. (1996). Assistive technology in the classroom. Technology Teacher, 56(2), 16. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.


Article #4

Assistive Technology in the Classroom. (2006)
Abstract:
This article discusses assistive technology in the classroom and the continued need to provide information about the availability of assistive technology, advances in improving accessibility and functionality of assistive technology, and appropriate methods to secure and utilize assistive technology in order to maximize the independence and participation of individuals with disabilities in society. Assistive technology is described in the article as any piece of equipment or device that may be used by a person with a disability to perform specific tasks, improve functional capabilities, and become more independent.

Netherton, D., & Deal, W. (2006). Assistive Technology in the Classroom. Technology Teacher, 66(1), 10-15. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.


Article #5

Genetic Disorders: An Integrated Curiculum Project.
Abstract:
Focuses on an integrated curriculum project with a strong link to technology education for the study of genetic disorders. Specific information acquired from interviews with patients; Design brief assignments; Benefits and recommendations.

Haynie, W., & Greenberg, D. (2001). Genetic Disorders: An Integrated Curriculum Project. Technology Teacher, 60(6), 10. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.


Article #6

Integration of Supportive Design Features and Technology.
Abstract:
The article considers the integration of supportive design features and technology into the home. People generally prefer to stay in their homes as opposed to moving to a retirement or assisted-living community. Regardless of whether individuals are considering purchasing, building, or retrofitting a home to be age-friendly, there are several design principles that should be taken into consideration. In addition to integrating supportive design features and technology into the home to alleviate environmental barriers and make living easier, the environment must be assessed to prevent falls in the home that could result in injury or even death. Falls in the home are a result of intrinsic, extrinsic, and environmental factors.

Lazaros, E., & Ahmadi, R. (2008). Integration of Supportive Design Features and Technology. Technology Teacher, 67(7), 20-25. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.


Article #7

Practical Answers to Concerns about Teaching the Handicapped.
Abstract:
If techniques can be used that help disabled students while also having application for other students, the result can be overall program improvement. This approach to finding solutions for some of the more prevalent technology teacher concerns is explored in this article. (CT)

Johnson, C. (1986). Practical Answers to Concerns about Teaching the Handicapped. Technology Teacher, 45(8), 11-13. Retrieved from ERIC database.
(NO FULL TEXT)

Article #8

Serving Mildly Handicapped Students in Technology Education.
Abstract:
Examines ways of meeting the needs of special education students in technology education. Discusses activity-oriented instruction, adding relevance to the instruction, the development of problem-solving and communication skills, the use of peer tutors, involving a special educator in industrial arts classes, safety concerns, and available resources for teachers. (CT)

Scott, M., & And, O. (1985). Serving Mildly Handicapped Students in Technology Education. Technology Teacher, 45(3), 5-9. Retrieved from ERIC database.
(NO FULL TEXT)

Article #9

Teaching Technology Education to Visually Impaired Students.
Abstract:
Discusses various types of visual impairments and how the learning environment can be adapted to limit their effect. Presents suggestions for adapting industrial arts laboratory activities to maintain safety standards while allowing the visually impaired to participate.

Mann, R. (1987). Teaching Technology Education to Visually Impaired Students. Technology Teacher, 47(3), 7-10. Retrieved from ERIC database.
(NO FULL TEXT)

Article #10

Technology and the Handicapped. Resources and Technology.
Abstract:
Discusses the need for all facilities to be accessible for people with disabilities. Describes devices that have enabled them to move into the mainstream of society. Includes design briefs with objectives, challenges, evaluation, and a student quiz.

Hadley, W. (1992). Technology and the Handicapped. Resources in Technology. Technology Teacher, 52(2), 15-21. Retrieved from ERIC database.
(NO FULL TEXT)

Article #11

Using Problem Solving to Teach the Diabled.
Abstract:
Investigates the use of problem-solving techniques in teaching students with disabilities, particularly in the technology education teacher preparation program at the Ohio State University in Columbus. Overall aim of the program to help disabled students more independent; Steps involved in the proposed Engineering for Success problem-solving design.

Cardon, P., & Scott, M. (2000). Using Problem Solving to Teach the Disabled. Technology Teacher, 59(8), 12. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.


Article #12

Identification, Assessment, and Intervention Strategies for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students with Learning Disabilities
Abstract:
This article discusses methods of identification used by teachers of the deaf and hard of hearing who were working
with students with learning disabilities, the training these teachers had received, and the accommodations and modifications they have implemented for their students.In the study, teachers indicated the use of various criteria to identify deaf and hard of hearing students with learning disabilities, and indicted that they incorporated a variety of accommodations to meet these students’ needs.

Soukup, M. & Feinstein, S. (2007). Identification, Assessment, and Intervention Strategies for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Students with Learning Disabilities. American Annuals for the Deaf, 152(1), p.56-62. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.



Article #13

Safer Science
Abstract:
This article discusses how to make science classrooms more safe and inclusive for students with mobility impairments. Changes included modifications to: safety eye washes and showers, fume hoods, laboratory sinks, laboratory workstations.

Roy, K. (2010). Safer Science. Science Teacher, 77(1), p.10-11. Retrieved from Academic Search Complete database.




Article #14

Including Young People with Disabilities: Assessment Challenges in Higher Education
Abstract:


Hanafin, J., Shevlin, M., Kenny, M. & McNeela, E. (2007). Including Young People with Disabilities: Assessment Challenges in Higher Education. Higher Education, 54(3), p.435-448. Retrieved from Education Search Complete Database.